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Rowing FAQs

HS/Novice Frequently Asked Questions about UMW Rowing Program

  1. When I visit campus, how do I meet up with the coach or members of the crew?
    1. Open hours for Goolrick Hall and Fitness Center:  As you come from central campus headed west, you come to the front entrance of the Fitness Center, with Anderson Hall on your left (south) and Goolrick Hall to the north.  The buildings are all connected.  The fitness center is open Monday through Friday starting at 6:00 AM, and Saturday starting at 11:00 AM.  It is also open on Sundays, but crew does not practice on Sundays.
    2. Best times to visit, when not shadowing a student:  If possible, it would be best to try to watch an erg session, if the crew is not practicing on the water.  Erg practice times M-F are 6:00 to 7:30 AM and 4:00 to 5:30 PM.  Once the crew starts practicing on the water, we meet at the upper level of the Alvey St parking deck, where we keep two UMW vans.  Meeting time is 5:25 AM, and we drive to Hope Springs Marina, arriving by 6:00 AM.  Practice will be over by 8:00 AM, so students can get back to UMW by 8:30 AM, and get to 9:00 AM classes.  Contact the coach if you will be visiting campus after the crew has started on-the-water practices.  Visiting students will be allowed to ride in a coach launch to observe practice, but wearing a UMW-provided PFD will be required.   There are only three coach launches, so there will be a very limited number of observers that can be accommodated on any one day.
    3. How to find the erg room: Coming from central campus, enter the main floor of the Fitness Center, and let the workers at the desk know you are headed to the erg room to observe.  Bear right after passing the desk area, then turn right to go down a hallway.  Go through a pair of double doors, then down one flight of stairs.  The erg room is just to your left as you exit the stairwell.
    4. How to find where Coach Rich Adams sits (currently in room 210) in Goolrick Hall:  Use the same stairwell for access to the erg room, except go up two flights of stairs to the top (second floor).  Go down the hallway to room 210 (Assistant Coaches).  Rich Adams sits in the back corner of room 210.
    5. How to meet up with crew and coach during winter training season:  If possible, try to arrange the meeting before-hand, so we can meet you at the front desk of Goolrick Hall.  Otherwise, go to the erg room (if during erg practice times), or to Room 210 (if between 9:30 AM and 3:30 PM).
    6. How to meet up with crew and coach during Spring Break:  Will have to work this on a case by case basis, depending on weather and plans for Spring Break crew practice.
    7. How to meet up with crew and coach once on-water rowing practice starts:  Please coordinate before-hand.  We can meet at Alvey Parking Garage at 5:25 AM to drive to Hope Springs Marina where we practice.  Otherwise, meetings with Coach Rich Adams can be arranged in Room 210, Goolrick Hall.  Once on-water practice starts, Coach Rich Adams may not always be at Goolrick.  Therefore, best to coordinate early.
    8. What is the coach’s recruiting timeline?  The coach will accept new members to the team at any time.  He is also available to talk to potential student-athletes, their parents, and their coaches any time allowed by the NCAA Division III recruiting rules (part 13).  Generally, a potential student-athlete must be at least a junior.  He is also willing to travel to homes or schools of potential student-athletes, but generally only within a local travel radius of northern Virginia, since there is no funding for such travel.
    9. Good list of points of contact – names, phone numbers, emails of people who can take time to meet with a prospective student-athlete:

Coach: Dr. Rich Adams, c: 703-850-4328   rowandsail@verizon.net  or   radams2@umw.edu

Team President: Anna-Kathleen (AK) Camper, acamper@mail.umw.edu

Women’s Team Co-Captain: Lauren Chartier, lchartie@mail.umw.edu

Women’s Team Co-Captain: Kiele Marston, kmarston@mail.umw.edu

Men’s Team Co-Captain: Corey Staier, cstaier@mail.umw.edu

Men’s Team Co-Captain:  Angus Long, along3@mail.umw.edu

  1. What are the implications of UMW being NCAA Division III school, and rowing being “Team Sport” status?
    1. Varsity, Club, Team Sport differences at UMW:  NCAA Division III schools cannot offer athletic scholarships.  Varsity sports fall under the direct supervision of the Athletic Director, and must abide by all the NCAA Division III rules.  At UMW, club sports are organized under a director of club sports and campus recreation, rather than under the athletic director.  Club sports receive very little university funding, so students generally have to support those programs through fund raising activities and dues.  Rowing and Rugby at UMW are deemed “Team Sports” by UMW.  This elevates their status somewhat, in that the head coaches are hired by and work for the Athletic Director, and the sports are under the supervision of the Athletic Director.  The head coaches receive a very small stipend for coaching, with some coaches also receiving compensation from dues.  The coaches are limited to working less than 1500 hours per year, and are thus deemed exempt from and do not receive any benefits.  Rowers are given limited access to an athletic trainer, and can also use some of the varsity training facilities such as the weight room.  The crew can also participate in the annual varsity sport fund raising activity, which is a big raffle ticket sale.  Men’s and women’s crew receive some funds from the Athletic Department, but the majority of the funding still has to come from dues and fund raising activities.
    2. Limitations on competing at regattas:  As a “Team Sport”, rowing at UMW is not recognized as a NCAA Division III varsity sport.  There are some regattas which have some events which are qualifying events for national championship regattas, and UMW women’s rowing is not allowed to enter those events.  Generally, these regattas will also have a second similar race for those teams that are not allowed to enter the varsity sport qualifying races. NCAA does not recognize men’s rowing as a varsity sport, so men’s rowing is not affected by this.
    3. Certified rosters – and requirements to be certified: Men’s and women’s rowing are treated with the same level of formality as varsity sports as far as having certified rosters.   Students on the official rosters must be in good standing with the university.  This means that the student must be actively enrolled at UMW and taking at least 12 hours of credit.  Special exceptions can be worked, with approval of the Athletic Director, and some programs, such as Nursing, have agreements with Germanna College to accept their credits – which count toward certification requirements.  Students that are on probation (generally due to low grades) can be certified on a roster, but this situation must be discussed with the coach.  The primary focus is on academics, not rowing, and as such, the coach will not encourage rowing activities that take so much time that a student’s academic progress is placed at risk.
    4. Funding implications, dues:  As a team sport, students must support the program through dues and other fund-raising activities.  Gifts from parents, alumni, and other friends of UMW Rowing are most welcome anytime, and donations can be made online to the UMW Foundation, designated for either UMW Women’s Rowing, or UMW Men’s Rowing.  Donations over $10 are tax-deductible.  In general, a student should expect to pay about $200 for fall semester rowing, and $300 for spring semester rowing.  Most of the money goes toward attending regattas, paying for transportation, paying for uniforms, and setting some money aside for new boats.
    5. No rowing scholarships: As a Division III school, UMW cannot offer athletic scholarships.  They can, however, offer academic scholarships.
    6. Contract status of coach: The head coach is on an annual contract with UMW that pays a small stipend, with those funds provided by the Athletic Director.  The head coach is not allowed to work more than 1500 hours per year, but this still allows more than sufficient time for coaching.
    7. NCAA Division III rules (where to find them – key parts).  These can be found by a google search on the internet.  Alternatively, an electronic copy can be obtained from Coach Rich Adams.  Part 13 pertains to recruiting, and must be followed carefully to ensure UMW does not violate any rules for recruiting student-athletes.  Since rowing is not a varsity sport, there is some flexibility with the rules, but only with the knowledge and approval of the Athletic Director.
    8. US Rowing rules (where to find them): http://www.usrowing.org/about/rulesofrowing  UMW Rowing is a member of US Rowing and our student-athletes are at least associate members with US Rowing waivers having to be signed before participating in some regattas.  UMW Rowing abides by US Rowing rules.
    9. Rowing board, responsibilities:  When rowing at UMW was changed from varsity sport to club sport, men’s rowing and women’s rowing had to establish a student board to run the program.  After one year as a club sport, UMW men’s and women’s rowing were established as team sports under the Athletic Department.  The board structure continues to be a very important decision making body, especially concerning the funds required to represent UMW in the sport of rowing.  The men’s and women’s teams work together on this board, although separate funding is maintained.  The board positions are shown on the team’s website under the Leadership area.  Rosters and coaches can also be seen on the UMW Rowing web site.
    10. Any chance the teams could work their way back to being a varsity sport?  This would be a decision for the Athletic Director, the University President, and the University Board.  At this point in time, it is not likely in the near future.   Dues and other fund-raising activities will continue to be required, but this should not seriously detract from the quality of rowing you may experience at UMW.
    11. Any experience required?  No.  We accept former HS rowers and coxswains, as well as student-athletes completely new to the sport of rowing.  We will even teach rowing to seniors.
    12. Are there separate dorms/dining/work out facilities for the athletes? Are athletes required to use them?  There are not any special dorms or dining facilities for student-athletes at UMW.  The Fitness Center is fairly well stocked with workout equipment for all students, and anyone may use that equipment.  Varsity sports have an additional weight room (with certified trainer), and as a Team Sport, UMW Rowing is allowed to use the varsity training facilities. 
  2. What equipment does UMW rowing have?
    1. Ergs: 17 Model D ergs mostly PM4 monitors; 1 Model D Dynamic erg, about 10 sets of sliders
    2. Boats:

Builder

Seats

Color

Description

Size

Name

Notes

Pocock

1X

White

single

MW

none

 

Wintech

4+ BL

White

International

MW

Eagle Pride

Rigged Middle (MW)

Vespoli

8+

White

 

LW

none

DS 8+, ultralite side-mount riggers, hull 288, Nov 1995

Vespoli

8+

Black

V1 Rhino

LW

no name

Women's varsity

Wintech

4+ BL

White

International

MW

Libris

Rigged High (HW)

Vespoli

8+

Black

V1 Rhino

LW

Prairie Banshee (Kansas)

Women's novice

Vespoli

8+

White

 

MW

Glory Days

Men's varsity

Wintech

2X/-

White

International

MW

Coach Schmehl

Men's varsity

Wintech

4+ BL

White

 

MW

Kathy Wright Barnes

Rigged Low (LW)

Vespoli

8+

White

 

LW

Coach Holdren

DS 8+, ultralite side-mount riggers, hull 263, Aug 1998

Wintech

8+ Sect

White

International

HW

Steve & Anne Gary Fuller

men's novice

Wintech

8+ Sect

Silver

International

HW

Hammond's Way

men's novice

Vespoli

4+

Black

 

HW

No name

Men’s varsity

Wintech

8+

Silver

International

HW

Robert Ericson

Men’s varsity

 

    1. Boat Trailer: One 12-rack full size boat trailer that can haul six 8+ boats, plus six smaller boats (provided pulled by a pick-up truck).
    2. Oars

Oars

         

Concept2

2 pr

 

Fat2 Vortex

 

Sculling

Concept2

2 pr

 

Big Blade

 

Sculling

Concept2

8

 

Fat2 Vortex

 

Sweep

Concept2

8

 

Smoothie 2 plain

 

Sweep

Concept2

4

 

Big Blade Vortex

 

Sweep

Concept2

8

 

Fat2 Vortex

 

Sweep

Concept2

4

 

Fat2 Vortex

 

Sweep

Concept2

8

 

Fat2 Vortex

 

Sweep

Concept2

8

 

Fat2 Vortex

 

Sweep

Concept2

4

 

Fat2 Vortex

 

Sweep

Concept2

2

 

Smoothie 2 plain

 

Sweep

Concept2

1

 

Fat2 Vortex

 

Sweep

 

    1. Coach launches and motors:  There are two aluminum jon boats owned by UMW Rowing, and a third jon boat owned by Coach Adams.  There are four Suzuki 9.9 hp outboard motors (one used as a spare).
  1. Where is practice held, and what times?
    1. Erg practice when not rowing on the water, is on campus in erg room in the Fitness Center.  Erg practice times M-F are 6:00 to 7:30 AM, and 4:00 to 5:30 PM.  Saturdays will probably find crews doing alternate forms of aerobic training, weather permitting.
    2. UMW Rowing will have two sessions in the varsity weight room: Tuesday from 5:00 to 6:00 PM and Thursday from 6:00 to 7:00 AM.  This training will not only help with strengthening rowers, but will also focus on flexibility, and balancing of muscle strength to help prevent injury.
    3. On-water practice is held at Hope Springs Marina, Stafford, VA.  This location is about 15 miles north of UMW, and requires about 25 minutes to drive each way.  Practice times Monday through Friday must be over by 8:00 AM so students can return to campus and get to 9:00 AM classes. We use two UMW 11-pax vans, plus student cars, to transport the team to/from practice.   Men’s and women’s teams will generally row on the water 3 times/week.
    4. Other UMW Rowing activities throughout the year: We have a “rent-a-rower” program for snow shoveling, leaf raking, etc. as an additional way to raise funds.  The teams may also participate in other events such as the annual “Lip Sync” contest.  Many student-athletes also participate in other extra-curricular activities, and this is also supported and encouraged by the coach.   For the last two years, the entire team has helped out at the US Marine Corps Marathon by manning a water station.
    5. University vans, other transportation to/from practices and regattas: The team applies for and receives access to two 11-pax UMW vans to use for transporting most of the team to/from Hope Springs Marina for practice.  We request additional vans when going to regattas.  The team does have to reimburse the University for use of the vans.  Van drivers must receive training and be certified to drive the vans, and students are encouraged to take this training and become certified.
  2. General questions
    1. Can I try it for a few weeks and see if I like it – before I pay any dues?  Absolutely.  We start fall season with some erg practices, and we do not require dues for erging.  Spring season starts early January in the erg room, with on-water practice not starting until late February.  Fall and Spring rowing are run as separate programs, with separate dues.  Student-athletes may participate in one or both, and there is no penalty for only participating in one.  UMW Athletics requires completion of paperwork, sickle cell test results, medical Sportsware completion, and concussion baselining before students can be allowed to join the roster for practice.
    2. Can anyone join the crew?  In general, yes.  We do not charge dues to participate in the erg sessions.  We do require payment of dues and a swim test before rowers or coxswains go on the water.  Due primarily to safety concerns, the head coach reserves the right to not allow a person in a rowing shell until acceptable erg performance has first been demonstrated, or for other safety related reasons.  In such rare cases, dues would not be required (or would be refunded), until the rower is ready to safely participate in rowing on the water.
    3. Are there things I can do at home, before I show up at UMW, to better prepare for rowing?  Absolutely.  First, get in good physical shape.  Especially focus on aerobic activity, such as running, fast walking, biking, swimming, or other sports that give good exercise.  Second, get in the habit of eating healthy food.  Third, be good with your time management, and this also means getting sufficient sleep.
    4. What does the crew do during Spring Break?  When the teams were varsity status, they would go south for a rowing camp.  With students now having to pay dues (about $500/year), some students use Spring Break for other activities such as supporting Habitat for Humanity or other similar work.  Some go home to work.  I expect each year will be different – with no promise of going to rowing camps in the south.
    5. What percentage of freshman remain on the team all four years?  Less than 50% row for all four years.  Some freshmen come to try it out, and they may only row fall semester and decide they don’t like rowing.  Some have issues with the dues required, and still others cannot afford the time away from academics.  Some rowers only participate spring semester when the racing is more fun – they may take a heavier course load in fall semester and not row (perhaps only stay fit by erging), then cut back to the minimum 12 hours required during spring semester so they can compete, yet still graduate in four years.
    6. Will I be able to do study abroad?  Yes – some of the rowers currently on the rowing team have done this, and a time to discuss study abroad with rowers who have done this should be able to be arranged.  Since there are no scholarships, and boat seating starts over each semester, study abroad is not problem, although the head coach would like to encourage maintaining good physical conditioning while studying abroad.
    7. Do members of the rowing team attend summer school to reduce the in-season course load?  They may if they wish, since 12 semester hours is required each semester in order for the student to be on the certified roster.  However, 12 semester hours each semester will generally not allow a student to graduate on-time, which is why some rowers may not row in the fall (in favor of a heavier fall course load).  Others may choose to attend summer school, but so far, I do not believe there will be any UMW rowing opportunities in the summer.
  3. Safety – discuss this a bit
    1. Safety is our number one concern – safety for people first, then for the equipment.  
    2. A swim test is required before being allowed to row or cox on the water. 
    3. Watching the US Rowing safety video is required before being allowed to row or cox on the water.
    4. Concussion baselining is required by the athletic department.
    5. Sickle cell testing (or attestation) is required by the athletic department.
    6. The men’s and women’s rowing teams will be required to participate in the UMW Athletic Department random drug screening program.  Approximately 10% of the student athletes will be randomly selected each semester to participate in the drug screening.  Student-athletes testing positive will be subject to sanctions and will be included on future drug screening lists.  More information on drug screening can be found in the UMW Student-Athlete Handbook.
    7. Any medical condition – see the coach.  This includes things like inhalers and allergies (peanuts or other food allergies because parents bring food to regattas, and bee or wasp stings because bees and wasps occasionally try to make their homes in the UMW boat trailer).
    8. We do not row in lightning/thunder, stormy weather with likelihood of lightning exists, or when winds are above 15 knots (ie whitecaps).  The water at Hope Springs Marina is fairly open, so we have to especially pay attention to winds.
    9. We start rowing before daylight, so we use lights.
    10. Coaches wear PFDs, and use kill switches on motors.  Launches carry nine extra PFDs and tow ropes.
    11. Coxswains may, at their discretion, wear PFDs.  We also have five cold weather coxswain suits that may be worn in cold weather, and these also have significant flotation built in.
  4. Do I need to purchase any special clothing for rowing?  Maybe – seats on ergometers and in boats run on rollers or wheels, so it is important that rowers not wear loose-fitting clothing that would get caught under the wheels or rollers.  When rowing, the oar handle must be pulled very close to the torso before the oar is extracted from the water, and loose-fitting clothing can hinder proper oar handle movement.  In the early fall, close-fitting T-shirts generally work fine, but loose floppy shirts can cause problems.  In general, tight-fitting shorts are best for rowing, and the team can assist with any details of what types of clothing will work best.  Specialty rowing clothing is not cotton, so works best for wicking moisture away from the body.  The special rowing gear also works better in rainy weather.
    1. What does the team supply, and when: The team will order rowing uniforms using monies from dues (not State funds), and rowers own and keep these uniforms.  These uniforms should not be worn at practice – keep them looking nice for regattas.
    2. What should I wear for practice?  In general, tight-fitting clothing works best.  In late fall and early spring, extra layers of clothing are highly advised.  Rowing may start with rowers wearing extra layers, and then as they warm up, these extra layers can be removed and stored in the boat by the feet – and then put back on when finished rowing.  We have four special cold-weather suits for coxswains to wear.
    3. What do I need to purchase, and where can I obtain rowing clothing?  Please talk to the coach or other student rowers before spending much money on rowing clothing.  There are several companies that make rowing clothing.
    4. What about rowing in cold weather?  Layers are key for rowing in cold weather.  Rainy weather?  Try to wear the special clothing that is not cotton.
    5. The team also has specially designed dark blue Nike polo shirts with the UMW Rowing logo.  These cost $30 and are not covered by dues.  We wear these for special UMW Rowing events such as on regatta days, team travel, team photos, etc.
  5. How big is the team, selection criteria?  Rosters are posted on the web site, and the actual sizes of the teams can vary significantly from semester to semester.  Currently, there are 12 men rowing, 10 women rowing, and 4 coxswains.  Coxswains can join either team, although coxswains on one team may be required to cox the other team depending on practice attendance.  We have one head coach for both teams and one assistant coach who also pulls the boat trailer.  We are actively trying to grow our program, and we have the seats in boats to more than double the number of rowers and coxswains.
    1. Requirements to join:  First, a desire to participate in one of the greatest sports, and to work as a team.  Rowing at UMW is a team sport.  Student-athletes must be in good academic standing, meaning they must be taking 12 semester hours.  Students on academic probation will be considered on a case-by-case basis.  Students must pay dues before rowing on the water.
    2. Coaching help: Coach Adams handles all coaching in the erg room.
  6. How does boat seating work?

Race seating criteria – not in any particular order, but first two are the big ones.  Note that we do not currently take time for seat racing.

  1. Skill of rower, on the side (port or starboard) being considered (bladework, boat set, timing)
  2. Weight-adjusted erg score (see below) and ability of the rower to turn that power into boat-moving ability
  3. Rowers are divided into color-coded groups based on weight-adjusted erg scores.  Rowers in the yellow or white categories are not guaranteed seats in any boat at any regatta.
  4. Attendance at practice (primarily an issue if a student-athlete does not attend at least three practices per week)
  5. Weight (if trying to make up a lightweight entry)
  6. Natural stroke length of rower, and ability to row with others in the boat
  7. Number of races, and rest time in between
  8. Rowing with “rowing peers” (heavily based on 1, 2, 4 above)
  9. Rower availability and preferences (some prefer more races than others)
  10. Race event schedule, time to get a crew ready to race without having to “hot-seat” or be rushed
  11. Boat availability
  12. Space for boats on the boat trailer
  13. Athletic fitness level of the rower (especially when considering multiple races in hot weather) – also reflected in 2) above
  14. Amount of time practicing as a crew in a particular boat (especially for 4+, 2- entries)

During fall season, which is for head races (approximately 5000 meters in length), there is one 5K erg test required.  During spring season, which is for sprint races (2000 meters in length), there is one 2K erg test required. 

Rowers may have as many “do overs” on the erg tests as they wish.  The head coach collects the erg times and weights of the rowers.  This data is entered into a spreadsheet which is used to show a weight-adjusted erg score, using the formula found on the Concept 2 web site (weight-adjustment calculator).  This formula shows how fast 8 similar athletes should be able to row an 8-oared shell, assuming very good technique.  Names and weight-adjusted erg scores are shared among the team, but raw erg scores and weights of rowers are not shared.

Rowers and coxswains are not guaranteed a seat in a race – they earn it.  Everyone starts with a clean slate each semester.

    1. Novice/Freshmen boats vs Varsity boats:  For the purpose of collegiate racing, rowers who participated in high school rowing are still considered novices during their first year of collegiate rowing.  Even seniors in college can be novices, though, if they don’t row until their senior year.  Novices/freshmen generally have separate races during regattas, which allows them to compete against their rowing peers.  However, novices can also compete for seats in varsity boats. 
    2. Can freshmen compete for spots in varsity boats.  Yes.
    3. The profile breakout shown below is used when the weight-adjusted erg scores are posted.  Please note these are weight-adjusted erg scores, not raw erg scores.  The color code scheme is set by the head coach.  The top varsity boats will generally be filled with rowers who are BLUE or better for their weight-adjusted erg scores.  Novice boats might be GREEN or better. 

Men's 5K Weight-Adjusted Erg Score Criteria

 

Women's 5K Weight-Adjusted Erg Score Criteria

 

red

15:XX to 16:00

 

red

17:XX to 18:10

         

purple

16:00 to 16:50

 

purple

18:10 to 19:00

         

blue

16:50 to 17:40

 

blue

19:00 to 19:50

         

green

17:40 to 18:30

 

green

19:50 to 20:40

         

yellow

18:30 to 19:20

 

yellow

20:40 to 21:30

         

white

19:20 >

 

white

21:30 >

         

Men's 2K Weight-Adjusted Erg Score Criteria

 

Women's 2K Weight-Adjusted Erg Score Criteria

 

red

5:00 to 5:50

 

red

6:00 - 6:30

         

purple

5:50 - 6:10

 

purple

6:30 - 6:50

         

blue

6:10 - 6:30

 

blue

6:50 - 7:10

         

green

6:30 - 6:50

 

green

7:10 - 7:30

         

yellow

6:50 - 7:10

 

yellow

7:30 - 7:50

         

white

7:10 >

 

white

7:50 >

 

    1. Opportunities for lightweights to compete for varsity spots, or to race as lightweight entries: If we have sufficient lightweight rowers (130 pounds for women, 165 pounds for men), we will consider entering lightweight entries in races.  Lightweight rowers tend to be very competitive for seats in open-weight boats because of the selection criteria as shown above.  Using weight-adjusted erg scores tends to even the score pretty well.
    2. Where do you rank me on your list of possible recruits?  Even if the head coach had a resume that included erg scores and weight (which makes it possible to compute a weight-adjusted erg score), the boat seating criteria is still very much focused on the ability of the rower to contribute to good boat speed.  As such, it is impossible to say much about relative rankings of rowers when the coach has not seen their erg technique or scores, much less seen their rowing technique on the water.
  1. Boat types: Most collegiate regattas are heavily focused on sweep rowing events, with primarily 8+ and 4+ races.  There will sometimes be a 2- race for sprint season, but not necessarily during head race season.  Some regattas will have 1X races, some will not.  At UMW, we focus on sweep rowing, although rowers wanting to row/race a single or a pair will be accommodated.  The head coach is primarily a sculler, so coaching can be worked in small sculling boats.
  1. What regattas and events does the team try to attend?  See the UMW rowing web site for more information on the schedule of expected regattas to attend.
    1. Fall – Occoquan Chase (Sandy Run Park, 10450 Van Thompson Road, Fairfax Station, VA)
    2. Fall – one head race in Richmond or possibly the Head of the Schuylkill in Philadelphia, PA
    3. Fall – Head of the Occoquan (Sandy Run Park, 10450 Van Thompson Road, Fairfax Station, VA)
    4. Spring – Occoquan Sprints (Sandy Run Park, 10450 Van Thompson Road, Fairfax Station, VA)
    5. Spring – possibly a scrimmage or regatta at William & Mary or VCU, Richmond
    6. Spring – Kerr Cup (Boathouse Row on Schuylkill River, Philadelphia, PA)
    7. Spring – MARCs (Gifford Pinchot State Park, Lewisberry, PA) 
    8. Participation in DAD VAIL regatta will be considered as a special situation, since it comes after the end of the academic semester at UMW.   However, this would be an exception for only top crews, and those people attending would be required to pay extra.
  2. Info on head coach, assistant coach, priorities, resumes:  Short resume for Rich Adams can be found on the teams’ UMW Rowing web site.  Rich’s rowing instruction is heavily focused on technique.  Academics take priority over rowing.  Safety of people is most important thing on the water, at all times.
    1. Do you have assistant coaches?  This year, we have one assistant coach who may do some coaching on Saturdays, and who also pulls the boat trailer to regattas.
    2. How would you describe your coaching style? (i.e. does each coach only coach one boat? does the head coach coach all boats?)?  The head coach will generally coach one or two boats each practice session, and will try to spend at least one practice session with each boat each week.
  3. General insights on the budgets, funds available, where monies are spent.  The first chart shows the primary sources of revenue used to fund UMW rowing.  As can be seen, the fall and spring dues (green and blue), together with Virginia state funds received from UMW (in red), comprise nearly all funds received.

 

 

The second chart shows the primary expenses of the combined men’s and women’s rowing teams.  Overnight costs for away regattas assume 4 rowers per hotel room. 

 

  1. Parents of rowers & coxswains, how active a group are they, how they help:  Parents of Maryland and Virginia students tend to be very active supporters, and many of them attend the regattas, especially those on the Occoquan Reservoir at Sandy Run Park.  They bring delicious food, and their support is greatly appreciated by the coaching staff and especially the crew.  They share contact information, with an online application called Signup Genius being used to help coordinate foods being brought to local regattas.  Because of this, if any rower or coxswain has any type of serious food allergy, it is best to make the coach aware of this early for safety reasons.  Especially important are peanut allergies.  The team purchases meals for the more expensive regattas in Pennsylvania.
  2. What information about my HS rowing, if any, would UMW be interested in?
    1. Erg scores, weight, experience level, how much sweep rowing, sculling, or coxing have you done
    2. Sweep side preference, and how strong that preference is?
    3. Have you ever rowed in the bow seat of a 1X, 2X, or 4X?
    4. Contact information for HS coaches